Red Hot Christmas Deal: get free books!

holidaysAs we all know, books make excellent Christmas gifts. Since FableCroft is moving house this Christmas and needs to de-stash, we’d love to sell you some!

For a limited time, buy TWO or more FableCroft books in one transaction direct from our website, and I’ll throw in a third Secret Santa surprise FableCroft book absolutely FREE for you to keep or gift onwards! Buy five books? Get TWO random ones free!

Offer ends midday Saturday December 10 with orders shipped immediately to beat Christmas!

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It’s nearly Bounty time! Giveaway and launch details…

We’re launching the long awaited Mocklore collection Bounty by Tansy Rayner Roberts this weekend at Conflux. Join us in Canberra at the Novotel on Northbourne Avenue, 5.30pm on Sunday October 2. We’d love to hang out with you!

And don’t forget, there’s just one day left to enter to win a copy of the book on Goodreads!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Bounty by Tansy Rayner Roberts

Bounty

by Tansy Rayner Roberts

Giveaway ends September 29, 2016.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway

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A FableCroft Announcement

The time has come, the walrus said, to speak of many things…

Next Sunday, at Conflux, we will be launching Tansy Rayner Roberts’ Mocklore collection, Bounty. This launch will take place 5.30pm at the Novotel Canberra on Northbourne Ave. And it will be the final book we produce for the foreseeable future.

FableCroft will be in indefinite hiatus following Conflux. Due to my family circumstances, and with an interstate move (and the new job that will hopefully come with that) at the end of the year, I no longer have the time or financial resources to devote to the press. I have been thinking about this for several months, and come to this decision (as with many others this year) with much regret and sadness.

I am extraordinarily grateful to my wonderful authors, artists, designers and proofreaders for their willingness to work with me over the past six years, and feel very privileged to have been able to publish your wonderful work. And thank YOU to every person who has supported FableCroft during this time, as a reader, reviewer, retweeter etc – you’re all awesome!

I will not say this is a final farewell, because perhaps, hopefully, I will one day be in a position to revitalise the press once more. I’d certainly like to, as I love this gig enormously. But life is life, and sometimes you have to put stuff aside – for a little while or a long one – and focus on other things.

At this stage, FableCroft anthologies will still be available in print and ebook from your preferred e-tailer (and on this site while print stocks last), but I am negotiating with writers regarding single author collections and novels and some of these will revert to their author.

Again, my thanks. I look forward to seeing the many creators we have published since 2010 flourish!fare-thee-well

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IN YOUR FACE is successfully launched!

In Your Face Launch

At 3pm on Saturday 17 September, a wild bunch of Canberra speculative fiction lovers (and some ring-ins from interstate) packed out A Bite To Eat in Chifley for the official launch of the confronting, challenging anthology In Your Face. The publisher and several authors took centre stage to talk a bit about the book and their individual stories, and bitey cakes and drinks were enjoyed by all.

In Your Face Launch

A huge thanks to everyone who participated in the launch – it was loads of fun (if a bit noisy in the venue) and a wonderful way to recognise the hard work of everyone involved. Especial gratitude to Cat Sparks for photographing the event, and as always, to the authors who have permitted me to publish their amazing work, to SpecFaction NSW for the initial seed funding, and to all the Pozible supporters who helped bring the book to life, as well as Amanda Rainey for the dramatic cover, and Elizabeth, Matthew and Katharine for proofing. You’re all awesome and the book could not be what it is without you.

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FableCroft News, Events and Giveaways!

After a bit of a quiet period recently, we’ve got a busy couple of weeks ahead!

In Your Face cover

  1. The official (if belated…) book launch for In Your Face is happening THIS Saturday in Canberra! Details here.
  2. We’ve sent Tansy Rayner Roberts’ new Mocklore book, Bounty, off to the printer, and the ebook is available for preorder on Amazon right now! You can also enter to win a copy over at Goodreads.
  3. On Sunday October 2, as part of the Canberra speculative fiction convention Conflux, Tansy and I will be launching Bounty – it’s bound to be loads of fun! More information here.

bounty_cover

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It’s book launchin’ time!

In Your Face coverWe’re (finally) launching In Your Face and you’re all invited! Join with editor Tehani and many of the fabulous authors to celebrate (a little belatedly) the launch of the challenging and confronting In Your Face anthology.

Important details:

3–4pm on Saturday 17 September @ A Bite To Eat in Chifley
(8 Eggleston Cres, Chifley ACT 2606)

Please RSVP to Tehani at fablecroft@gmail.com for catering purposes!

Look forward to seeing you there.

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Exciting news! Congrats to Stephanie Burgis!

ITH CoverWe are super excited today to see that Stephanie Burgis’s wonderful novelette “The Art of Deception” from Insert Title Here has been shortlisted in amazing company for the WSFA Small Press Award! Huge congratulations, Steph! Full press release below.

The WSFA Small Press Award Committee Announces Finalists for 2016 Award  for stories published in 2015.
The Washington Science Fiction Association (WSFA) is pleased to announce the finalists for the 2016 WSFA Small Press Award for Short Fiction:
“The Art of Deception,” by Stephanie Burgis in Insert Title Here, ed. by Tehani Wessely, published by Fablecroft Publishing, (April 2015);
“Burn Her,” by Tanith Lee in Dancing Through The Fire, ed. by Ian Randal Strock, published by Fantastic Books (September 2015);
“Cat Pictures Please,” by Naomi Kritzer, published in Clarkesworld Magazine, ed. by Neil Clarke and Sean Wallace, (January 2015);
“The Empress in Her Glory,” by Robert Reed, published in Clarkesworld Magazine, ed. by Neil Clarke and Sean Wallace, (April 2015);
“The Haunting of Apollo A7LB,” by Hannu Rajaniemi in Hannu Rajaniemi: Collected Fiction published by Tachyon Publications, (May 2015);
“Headspace,” by Beth Cato in Cats In Space, ed. by Lawrence M. Schoen, published by Paper Golem LLC, (December 2015);
“Leashing the Muse,” by Larry Hodges, published in Space and Time Magazine, ed. by Hildy Silverman, (May 2015);
“Leftovers,” by Leona Wisoker in Cats In Space, ed. by Lawrence M. Schoen, published by Paper Golem LLC, (December 2015);
“Today I Am Paul,” by Martin L. Shoemaker, published in Clarkesworld Magazine, ed. by Neil Clarke and Sean Wallace, (August 2015).
The award honors the efforts of small press publishers in providing a critical venue for short fiction in the area of speculative fiction.  The award showcases the best original short fiction published by small  presses in the previous year (2015). An unusual feature of the selection  process is that all voting is done with the identity of the author (and publisher) hidden so that the final choice is based solely on the quality of the story.
The winner is chosen by the members of the Washington Science Fiction Association (www.wsfa.org) and will be presented at their annual convention, Capclave (www.capclave.org), held this year on October 7-9, 2016 in Gaithersburg, Maryland.
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Latest news and reviews

Rapunzel CoverRay Thompson reviewed The Rebirth of Rapunzel in issue #77 of Historical Novels Review, saying: Forsyth’s argument is convincing, her prose clear, and the insights into the tale’s influence on her own work, especially Bitter Greens, fascinating. Definitely recommended. 

And Steph4 on Amazon says: “…a five star work…”

Striking Fire cover-1“A Friend in the Trade” from Dirk Flinthart’s collection Striking Fire made it onto Ellen Datlow’s Honorable Mentions list for her The Best Horror of the Year volume 8, as did “2B” by Joanne Anderton, “Salvatrix” by Marianne de Pierres, “Sins of Meals Past” by Matthew Morrison, “Oil and Bone” by Dan Rabards and “The Winter Stream” by Daniel Simpson (from Insert Title Here). Congratulations all!

ITH Cover

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What’s been going on lately?

A new review of Cranky Ladies of History from Matthew Davis at GoodreadsThis book covers a wide variety of periods, genres and voices, but one thing that remains consistent is the level of quality … This was my first Fablecroft book, but on the strength of this collection, it sure won’t be the last.

Thanks Matthew, that warms the cockles of this editor’s heart!

Cute little review of Dirk Flinthart’s Striking Fire by Rivqa, also at GoodreadsA fine collection with some unexpected (for me) gems…

Catching up on several Goodreads reviews of Tansy Rayner Roberts’s Pratchett’s Women essay collection that I somehow managed to miss!

  1. Mike said: “I’d recommend it to anyone who’s interested in non-ranty feminist perspectives and fantasy fiction
  2. Amanda said: “Tansy’s honest, soul-searching, and massively enthusiastic take on how female characters are portrayed in the Discworld universe is an excellent read.”
  3. Octavia Cade said: “this works as an entertaining introduction It’s got that nice chatty blog vibe to it.”
  4. Cindy said: “[it] made me want to reread a whole bunch of the Pratchett books again!”

Thanks so much for taking the time to review our books!

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Revisiting Pern, the great McCaffrey reread: THE MASTERHARPER OF PERN

Tehani and Marisol bonded over Pern (and Doctor Who) at a science fiction convention, decided that it was time for a reread of the series, and really, they should blog about that. They are reading in Anne McCaffrey’s preferred way, which is basically publication order.  

gl49of4nx3uzug5weu1fPern Series – The Masterharper of Pern

M: *rubs hands together* I’ve been looking forward to this one since we decided to do this readthrough. And going through all the other books has only heightened my anticipation.

Robinton is one of the longest running Pern characters, and this fills in an incredible number of gaps about his history. Not only that, but this is the only book in the series which concentrates around one person’s story. There’s very little headhopping, no scenes with Robinton not present, and the book shines because of it. This is the meatiest book in the series, and it’s a read of pure satisfaction. Even if his personal life was filled with tragedy.

24870T: I remember when I bought this book! It was on my only international trip ever, and I read it on a plane and it was (and remains) one of my very favourites in the series (partly because of sense-memory, probably!). And my gosh, it’s hard to believe it’s nearly 20 years old!

M: Petiron was a huge surprise in this book. In the Harper Hall trilogy, he comes off as someone who really loves Menolly, and this sort of old man who, despite being a type A stickler, is all right. Now we find out that Petiron, who is Robinton’s father, is a great musician, and a terrible human being. He’s incredibly selfish, and everything in his life revolves around him. I know there’s a huge push for us to see how badly he treats Rob as a baby – doesn’t care about him, pushes him away and ignores him, sees him as competition for his wife’s attention – but I think what really drives home the point is how he treats his wife. She’s his favorite, most precious toy. Virtually all of his decisions revolves around how he can dress her up and show off his prized possession. Getting denied results in sulks and tantrums. About the only redeeming quality to him personally is he will fuss over her if she’s sick. but even then, it’s like his toy has to be brought back to pretty.

T: I found this FASCINATING. Did her death really change him so much? Did he regret his behaviour towards Robinton his whole life, and try to redeem himself in Menolly? Although even then, really, he didn’t actually come into the “modern” world, because he never told the Masterharper that Menolly was a girl. So he changed a bit, but not heaps?

M: The flipside of this is getting to watch the Masterharper grow from childhood prodigy. I’d never really thought about that, but looking back again at things said in other books, it’s clear part of his deep connection with Menolly stems from almost identical pasts – neglect is still abuse, and being a sensitive, prodigal child leaves its own mark in any situation.

T: And he’s so very gifted, which makes it even more sad that Petiron only saw him as a rival for his mother Merelan’s attention. Not even jealousy of his talent (although Merelan clearly did worry that would also be an issue) but literally that Robinton competed for her time.

M: It also clears up why Sebell got picked as Masterharper rather than Menolly, which rather piqued me in previous books.

T: It never bothered me, actually, because Sebell was always presented as older and more, hmm, well-rounded, I guess, in the Harper craft. Menolly has insane talent, but without the full grounding the entire Harper world. But yes, nice to have some explicit explanation of why.

M: Biggest surprise still for me was seeing how much Robinton spoke with dragons. I’d gotten the impression he’d not had many spoken interactions with them in previous books, and re-reading this made me wonder if that was a misunderstanding on my part, inconsistency, or a deliberate misconstrue.

T: It’s really interesting when a person who you know as an older character, with a lot of responsibility from the first moment we meet him, is revealed to us from childhood. It would be a great exercise to have a new reader START with the Masterharper book and read in internal chronology, to see their different responses to characters.

M: And speaking of inconsistency – what the heck was with the big change in the Charter and handling upstart Holders? Reading Dragonseye back to back with this made me feel like I’d lost something. The Charter clearly makes provisions for Holders committing atrocities. Wouldn’t there have been enough between the escapees and not allowing people to learn the Charter? I thought the last book laid out clearly that’s a violation of the people’s rights? Gah!

T: I thought that was cleverly done! The way I read it was the loss of knowledge was accelerating (due to plagues, deterioration of records and the like), so fewer people actually knew and followed the Charter. Maybe that was just my interpretation though…

And it wouldn’t be a Pern book without sobbing – I was beside myself when Robinton walked the tables as a journeyman (even just glancing at the page again now brought tears prickling!).

Previously, in the Great Pern Reread of 2015:

Dragonflight

Dragonquest

The Harper Hall trilogy (Dragonsong, Dragonsinger, Dragondrums)

The White Dragon

Moreta: Dragonlady of Pern / Nerilka’s Story

Dragonsdawn

The Renegades of Pern

All the Weyrs of Pern

The Chronicles of Pern: First Fall

The Dolphins of Pern

The Chronicles of Pern: Red Star Rising

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